Presentations

Measuring Student Experiences in Moodle: A Classroom Research Support Model

Research Report

Linda Neff
Instructional Technologist, e-Learning Center, Northern Arizona University

Dr. Michelle Miller
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Northern Arizona University

Dr. Suzanne L. Pieper
Coordinator for Assessment, e-Learning Center, Northern Arizona University

Georgia Michalicek
Business Process Consultant, Information Technology Services, Northern Arizona University

October, 2011

Introduction

The e-Learning Center, Information Technology Services, and Department of Psychology at Northern Arizona University (NAU) collaborated on a classroom research support project to investigate student experiences in Moodle in an online undergraduate psychology course. The Moodle student experience included student perceptions of LMS overall impressions, frequency of use, navigation and support issues, and learning experiences in an online undergraduate psychology course. The researchers drew from multiple data sources to explore the student experience. In particular, they analyzed responses to a voluntary student perception survey and to open-ended writing prompts as well as Moodle system reports, ITS helpline logs, and final grades. Results suggest that students generally had a positive experience using Moodle with few navigation and support issues. Additionally, students primarily interacted in the Moodle discussion forums and lessons. Furthermore, correlations illustrated that students with higher course grades tend to interact in the discussion area more. The results of this case study contribute to the research on student experience and learning within an online learning management system.

Classroom Research Support Model

  1. Form the planning team.
  2. Collaboratively plan the research design.
  3. Teach, observe, and collect data.
  4. Discuss and analyze results.
  5. Reflect and plan next steps.

Research Questions

Did students have a positive experience using Moodle?

What was the frequency of Moodle student navigation and support issues?

What is the frequency of student use of Moodle resources and activities?

Does the frequency of student use of Moodle resources and activities correlate with student grade performance?

Data

Participant Demographics

University-wide LMS Pilot Study

PSY 260 Case Study: Student Perception Survey Responses

PSY 260 Case Study: LMS System and Correlation Studies

GENDER

Male

44

1

8

Female

82

10

21

AGE

< 17

2

0

0

18-23

49

8

19

24-29

31

1

7

30-39

30

1

2

40-49

8

0

0

50-59

4

0

1

60-69

1

0

0

Declined to answer

1

1

0

CLASS STANDING

Freshman

9

0

0

Sophomore

14

0

2

Junior

18

4

13

Senior

49

6

13

Graduate student

32

1

1

Other

4

0

0

Total Count

126

11

29

 

Did students have a positive experience using Moodle?

In PSY 260, 90% or more of students (n=11) agreed or strongly agreed with these statements:

  • I would like to take another Moodle course.
  • I have had a positive overall experience using Moodle.
  • Moodle is easy to use.

70% or more of the PSY 260 students agreed or strongly agreed with these statements:

  • Moodle fits my learning style.
  • Using Moodle in this course has improved my learning.

What was the frequency of Moodle student navigation and support issues?

Information Technology Services (ITS) Helpline Report Results

A report for all calls (n=5) to the Student Technology Center from any students enrolled in the PSY 260 Moodle course found that student technology problems were not directly related to the course or its delivery.

82% of students did not contact the Student Technology Center.

What is the frequency of student use of Moodle resources and activities?

The activity reports revealed that 29 students interacted with the Moodle system 21,117 times during the course delivery period.

Does the frequency of student use of Moodle resources and activities correlate with student grade performance?

Pearson correlation coefficients for each relationship between a student’s final grade and each Moodle activity

 

Assignments

Discussion Forum

Lessons

Quizzes

Resources

User Profile

Pearson Correlation

.215 .402* -.069 .147 .227 -.271

Sig. (2-tailed)

.263 .031 .723 .448 .236 .156

N

29 29 29 29 29 29

*. Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed).

**. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Students with higher final course grades tend to interact in the discussion area more.