Questions on Fugue No. 13
Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I
by Johann Sebastian Bach
©2014 Timothy A. Smith

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  1. The author writes that this work is a "fugue with invention." Please begin by reading this supplementary material on Bach's inventions, then finish the following analogy. Musical processes are to musical forms as:

    getting lost in thought is to being in unfamiliar territory.
    "the IRS" is to "theirs"
    filtering water at Ruby Creek is to containing it in a Nalgene bottle.
    baking a Bundt cake is to frosting it.

  2. Read the invention pages on melodic and contrapuntal inversion and evolutio, study the examples, then select the true statement.

    Melodic inversion involves multiple objects.
    Contrapuntal inversion involves multiple objects.
    Evolutio involves multiple objects.
    Two of the above
    All of the above

  3. Select the true statement.

    Melodic inversion involves single objects.
    Contrapuntal inversion involves single objects.
    Evolutio involves single objects.
    Two of the above
    All of the above

  4. Select the true statement.

    Melodic inversion involves both single and multiple objects.
    Contrapuntal inversion involves both single and multiple objects.
    Evolutio involves both single and multiple objects.
    Two of the above
    All of the above

  5. Watch the animation of the Two-Part Invention in C Major. Which segment(s) represent(s) the melodic inversion of mm. 3-4?

    mm. 11-12
    mm. 15-16
    mm. 19-20
    Two of the above
    None of the above

  6. Watch the animation of the Two-Part Invention in C Major. Which segment(s) represent(s) the evolutio of mm. 3-4?

    m. 3-4
    mm. 7-8
    mm. 15-16
    Two of the above
    None of the above

  7. The remaining questions are about the fugue in F sharp major, Well-Tempered Clavier book 1. The author calls the sections in pink (the daisy motif) a "three-part invention." Of the following, the best reason for this designation is that the daisy motif is heard:

    nowhere in the main exposition, neither in the sunny subject nor cloudy countersubject.
    26 times in its melodic inversion.
    three times in false sequence.
    A minimum of four times in each voice.

  8. Beginning in m. 7 the invention motif is heard in all three voices. One possible interpretation of this is as a second exposition, of a second subject, with the entire work being a double fugue. What is the best reason for NOT interpreting the work that way?

    The daisy motif is too short to be called a fugue's subject.
    The daisy motif is inverted in its alto exposition.
    The daisy motif has no countersubject.
    The daisy motif is not exposed in dominant/tonic polarity.

  9. In addition to developing the invention motif, the sequences of mm. 23-24 and 26-27 also develop:

    the subject's tail.
    the subject's head.
    the countersubject's tail.
    the countersubject's head.

  10. In the exposition, the cloudy countersubject is heard in a higher voice than the sunny subject. But in the development these two ideas are heard in double counterpoint. This is to say that the subject and countersubject are developed in the _________ of the fugue's exposition.

    evolutio
    melodic inversion
    contrapuntal inversion
    two of the above
    all of the above

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