2008 Southwest Institute for Learning with Technology @ Northern Arizona University Tracks

May 19-21, 2008 @ The W. A. Franke College of Business  

Key Note

Assessment

Tools, Tips, and Tricks

Pedagogies and Practice

Emerging Technologies

Special Topics

Open Lab


Presentation Key:PPodcastVVideo PodcastESynchronous SessionCRecorded Session

Key Note

Are You Using Technology to Assess Learning or Assessing Learning to Improve Technology?PVE

This keynote address will illustrate the differences between using outcomes-based assessment to evaluate how well instructional technology enhances student learning and how well technology can be used to assess and report on student learning Illustrations of both facets will be introduced and questions will be posited to stimulate discussion.

Marilee Bresciani
Marilee Bresciani

Considering Learning Spaces "2.0": Crafting Engaging Places in an Interaction AgePVE

The focus of Information Age technologies was digital content delivery; in the emerging "Interaction Age," technologies help people interact with content and each other in real time. Campuses today are augmented-reality environments where real and digital worlds intersect. How do physical learning spaces, designed for real-time co-located interactions, evolve to meet new expectations created by the availability of "web 2.0" applications, mobile devices, and other technological advances? Encouraging interactivity in this context requires environments that support technology-mediated interactions while preserving the richness of non-mediated activities.

This presentation discusses trends in technology that are shaping student and faculty expectations, describes new forms of learning spaces enabled by emerging interaction technologies, and advocates process reforms that will address challenges and opportunities in this new era.

Andrew Milne
Andrew Milne

Assessment

What technology-enhanced assessment strategies and methods are we using to improve student learning and development in our university courses?  How can we use assessment tools and techniques along with technology to improve the quality of our programs? Proposals might consider the impact of individual classroom assessment techniques that assess students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as techniques that assess perceptions of the learning environment.  Additionally, proposals might address the process of designing, refining, and implementing a program assessment plan at the department, college, or university level.

Good Practices in General Education AssessmentPVE

This interactive session describes the steps in creating and implementing rubrics to assess general education knowledge and skills. Key questions focus on academic freedom, data gathering in ways that inform student learning, and considerations when attempting to compare evidence of general learning or skill development across disciplines.

Marilee Bresciani
Marilee Bresciani

Tablet PCs and Classroom AssessmentE

Tablet PCs have been around for a while, and they are finally making their way into the classroom in sufficient numbers to make a difference. This session gives a brief overview of the tablet PC's capabilities and focuses on how tablets have been used in classroom instruction and classroom assessment at NAU as well as other universities.

Walter Nolan
Walter Nolan

The Reflection Journal as a Formative Assessment Tool

Mon May 19, 2008 4:00pm - 5:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 346

This session discusses the use of Blackboard Vista tools to enrich the learning experiences of Honors students in a first-year seminar in reading and writing. Following a brief discussion of their classes, the presenters will discuss why they adopted technology and how they used it. With a view to their current classroom environment and future course developments, the presenters assessed their students' blended learning experiences. The presentation focuses on how the instructors used the Bb Vista Journal to build formative assessment activities that allowed them to adapt their pedagogy to student needs. The presenters will discuss the choices they made in developing the Journal assignment, as well as summative assessment developed to understand how students used the tools provided.

John Doherty
John Doherty
Kevin Ketchner
Kevin Ketchner

Assessment for College Success: A Comparison of Technological Skills of Three Academic YearsE

We examined skill sets, frequency of use, and technological self-efficacy of students in high school and in freshman and senior levels of college. We assessed how these factors matched technology applications rated as important for success in college. We compared the responses to assess current and future student technological skills and attitudes.
 
To understand the computer attitudes and abilities of future and current students, we collected three-wave cross-sectional data from high school students (n = 88), college freshmen (n = 631), and college seniors (n = 123). The final sample (N = 842) completed in-class face-to-face or in-class online surveys that measured use, abilities, and attitudes towards technology. We also surveyed college professors about the technical skills they think students need to succeed in college. The data gave us a picture of current and prospective students' use of, abilities with, and attitudes toward computers.

Ann Huffman
Ann Huffman
William Huffman
William Huffman

Clickers Across the Disciplines

Tue May 20, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 346

"Clickers," the most recent generation of audience response system technology, are used in many applications within higher education. These wireless hand-held devices transmit signals to receivers, allowing instructors to pose questions in class, poll students, and display student responses instantaneously via computer. Clicker technology benefits both teachers and students. Clickers help instructors identify students' lack of understanding and adjust the presentation of course material.  Clickers can also improve student learning, engagement, and long-term knowledge retention. This talk summarizes the results of several studies on the use of clickers across the disciplines, including the benefits and challenges of using these systems.  A demonstration of clickers and question styles will let the audience experience this technology firsthand.

 Haist
Haist

Practical Uses of Clickers in Assessing Students: A Faculty Panel

Tue May 20, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 346

Are you thinking about using clickers in your classroom? Three faculty members from three different disciplines—biology, economics, and psychology—will discuss how they use clickers to promote student learning in their classes. The panelists will focus on the promises and pitfalls of this technology.

Larry MacPhee
Larry MacPhee
James Pinto
James Pinto
 Wirtz
Wirtz
Richard Holloway
Richard Holloway

Talking About Course Quality

Tue May 20, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 346

This session begins a discussion of course quality, especially in online learning environments. Attendees will get an overview of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education (Chickering & Gamson). The presenters will share some examples of these principles in practice. Attendees will learn how these principles can be applied to their own courses.

Walter Nolan
Walter Nolan
John Doherty
John Doherty

Thinking about Thinking: Metacognitive Frames for Online AssignmentsE

Research tells us that students who are able to reflect on their own learning are more likely to succeed in college and beyond. How do we teach metacognition? This session describes practical methods for prompting students in online or face-to-face courses to think about their thinking. Attendees will be invited to share their own successes and challenges in encouraging student reflection in their classrooms. A bibliography of resources on teaching metacognition will be provided.

John Doherty
John Doherty
Suzanne Pieper
Suzanne Pieper

Rubrics with a Twist P

Wed May 21, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 346

Rubrics have become a popular method of assessing complex student performances and products. This interactive session describes rubrics that move beyond the familiar written and oral communication examples. We will introduce rubrics that assess group discussions, collaborative activities, and long-range projects—all important elements of both online and face-to-face courses. Attendees will review rubrics in small groups, discuss how these assessment tools might benefit them and their students, and share their insights. A complimentary book, Introduction to Rubrics, by Stevens and Levi, as well as packets of sample rubrics will be provided to participants.

Kathleen Thatcher
Kathleen Thatcher
Suzanne Pieper
Suzanne Pieper

Tools, Tips, and Tricks

What valuable "lessons learned" can you share with university educators on how to use web applications, computer software, hardware, and media in the classroom? What decisions do you face and whom do you ask for help? Presentations might demonstrate effective strategies and shortcuts that make your life easier in the classroom.

Anytime. Any Place. Any Way. Youth and Media TodayP

Mon May 19, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 436

What does it mean for teachers when much of today's learning occurs online? What are students learning? And why is it so much more engaging than what comes from a textbook?
 
How can symbols, messages, and representations seen on TV or in the aisles at the grocery store be discussed in a meaningful way in class? And do they need to be? Are these messages new to the 21st century, or have they been around all along?
 
Is a new hip-hop or pop song allowed in an oral presentation? Should youth be encouraged to examine images and cover stories and headlines? Can you show parts of the 6 o'clock news in your class to illustrate a point?
 
Teachers tackle these issues and others, trying to find new ways to engage "digital natives" and to understand new media literacy, which is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and create media in a variety of forms. Media literacy is also about teaching youth to recognize and decode media characteristics.

Stacey Kizer
Stacey Kizer

Speaking of Collaboration

Mon May 19, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333

Wimba, Inc. will discuss how the Wimba Collaboration Suite can be used to facilitate and enhance both distance learning as well as students' interaction with the campus’ CMS. Wimba will also announce a completely new version of Wimba Pronto, an enhanced instant messaging system designed specifically for educational institutions. The strategic direction of technology in the classroom will be discussed as well as how other institutions are using Wimba products.

Matthew Minister
Matthew Minister
George O'Keefe
George O'Keefe

Concept Mapping with CMAPC

Mon May 19, 2008 4:00pm - 5:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 436

This hands-on session introduces participants to CMAP, free concept-mapping software developed by the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). The session will begin with a brief review of concept mapping, including its origin and uses. Participants will create their own maps using CMAP and will learn how to score them using a tablet PC. The session will conclude with uses of concept mapping, including programmatic planning and promoting student metacognition of course content. As part of this conclusion, the presenter will share data from three semesters of using CMAP with students.

Barbara Austin
Barbara Austin

Enhancing Collaboration, Participation, and Group Dynamics within Online Courses P

Tue May 20, 2008 9:00am - 10:00am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 436

This presentation explores the techniques and pitfalls of creating a learning environment that encourages collaboration, participation, and effective group dynamics among students who may never meet face to face.

Group concepts such as stages of development, task/maintenance functions, and the vacillation between fusion and independence are expressed differently online.  For example, to facilitate group interaction, an instructor must teach not only content, but also new modes of communication such as texting, emoticons, and appropriate written feedback to fellow student posts. Without nonverbal cues, the instructor also must sense when to intervene with a group in trouble or, alternatively, when to let the students work through their frustrations to form a cohesive unit.

Drawing on a combined experience of 15 years of online instruction, the co-presenters will discuss ways to foster group process within the online course structure. In addition to a current review of research, the effects of age, technological savvy, and ethnicity within online group communication will also be explored. The presenters will share effective tips and strategies as well as issues that continue to be a challenge. Through small group interaction, participants will have opportunities to share concerns and solutions to their own experiences with online group dynamics.

Lakota Grace
Lakota Grace
 Hood
Hood

Using Wikis in the Second Language Classroom

Tue May 20, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 344 LAB

Wikis are online tools that provide students opportunities to collaboratively construct content and use the language they are learning in a creative way. This presentation shows participants how to design wikis using the tool Wetpaint. It also demonstrates the use of other web tools (Slideshare, Viewpoint, Audacity) that support the inclusion of audio files, PowerPoint presentations, images, and video to enhance the content of a wiki. Examples of wikis designed to teach Spanish and English as a second language will be shared. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of using wikis will be discussed.

Yuly Asencion Delaney
Yuly Asencion Delaney

Silver Bullets: Creating Engaging Interactive Activities in PowerPointPE

Many instructors desire to provide engaging interactive computer activities for their students but constraints of time, budget, and skills create formidable obstacles. Meanwhile, many of these same instructors commonly use Microsoft PowerPoint to develop slides to supplement lectures but limit its use to this purpose. In this session, the presenter demonstrates how instructors can use PowerPoint to create dynamic interactive activities for online and face-to-face courses. Because activity development uses familiar software, builds on existing skills, and requires only a small investment of time, former obstacles to activity development are easily overcome. Once an activity is developed, it can be used as a template to produce additional activities, making possible any number of variations that can be adapted to new content. Beyond ease of use and time-saving features, additional advantages are that PowerPoint assists developers in creating activities that help diverse learners achieve basic and higher-level learning outcomes.

Jacqueline Burchum
Jacqueline Burchum

Event Planning Using Wikis

See how a wiki can help you plan an event. This hands-on session focuses on using wikis in organizing a departmental or university-wide event.

Participants will use PBwiki, a popular application among educators, to think about how the wiki should be structured, what pages are needed, how pages will be formatted, how to communicate about the wiki, and more.

This session is intended for participants who already know what a wiki is and would like to learn how to use wikis in their own work practice.

Sharon Gorman
Sharon Gorman

Use of CPS to Administer Multiform Exams in Large Sections

Wed May 21, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 436

This presentation covers how to set up multiform exams for class administration via CPS. Demonstrations include use of the fast-grade option, importing exam questions, engaging multiple exam forms, use of the instructor's view during the administration of the exam, and how to upload the results of the exam to einstruction.com. The study guide and question answer grids will be discussed.

Richard Holloway
Richard Holloway

Camtasia Studio for Online and Web-Enhanced Classrooms

Wed May 21, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 436

TechSmith's Camtasia Studio, software for recording videos of computer screens, is rising in popularity among instructors of online and web-enhanced courses. Many use the tool to create visually engaging lectures. However, Camtasia Studio is also helpful in creating screen videos that help students (especially online learners) navigate trouble spots. This presentation illustrates ways in which screencasts can fill instructional gaps that traditionally have been addressed by direct interaction between student and instructor. Demonstrations will include the following: review and explication of assignment sheets, analysis and critique of sample student essays, interpretation of statistical data, and responses to student writing. Screencasts can be used for personal, detailed instruction in a reviewable form that fosters student learning.

Ric Jahna
Ric Jahna

Pedagogies and Practice

How do departments and universities allocate and manage instructional and technological resources that promote learning?  How do we prepare, communicate, and provide feedback to educators about instructional design practices that incorporate technology? How does a program scaffold the use of technology between the lower division and upper division courses?  How do we connect university students with the local and regional community?  Proposals should have practical relevance to the instructional design, development, implementation, and best practices in the use of technology in a variety of learning contexts.

How Instructional Technology Promotes Learning: Ideas from Cognitive PsychologyP

Mon May 19, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

Opponents of technology-aided instruction sometimes characterize this approach as being lower in quality or effectiveness than traditional face-to-face instruction.  However, memory research suggests that not only are online teaching tools reasonably effective, they offer several advantages over traditional methods. Cognitive researchers have identified a number of principles that govern why we remember — and forget — what we do. Instructional technology meshes remarkably well with several of these principles, opening up new ways to promote memory for course material among our students. This talk focuses on three memory principles in particular — the testing effect, the spacing effect, and memory as an adaptation — and presents ways in which instructional technology can take advantage of each. Suggestions range from the use of low-stakes auto-generated quizzes within Vista Blackboard to user-generated content to rich media.

Michelle Miller
Michelle Miller

Gaming in the Classroom

Mon May 19, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

Using computer games as a teaching tool and be an effective and engaging method for applying theory learned in the classroom. Groups of students use Caesar (version) gaming software run in a department computer lab to create and build Roman cities, applying urban and economic theory, concepts and models. Formal and informal gaming periods are expected. In class and in lab discussion are held regarding models and concepts from lectures and readings that may be incorporated or illustrated. Group papers explain the Caesar-built cities in terms of the final set up, urban evolution with models and theories, measuring success of the cities and discussing its perceived sustainability.

Rebecca Hawley
Rebecca Hawley

Implementing Team Projects in an Online CoursePE

Collaborative projects are an important part of the learning process. For many classes they, along with group discussions, are the center point of the classroom experience. Making the translation to a Web-based course can be daunting for both the instructor and the students. Students are often well versed in the use of digital communication technologies, but they rarely use them to produce collaborative products. The key to success in the digital classroom is to structure the projects to make the best use of the technologies and to carefully guide the students through the process. This session covers the ins and outs of collaborative projects in a Web class.

Dot Lestar
Dot Lestar
Jane  Martin
Jane Martin

Self-Construction: Your Online Identity

Tue May 20, 2008 9:00am - 10:00am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

Constructing a strong identity in your online course allows you to connect to your students better, and in a way that allows more fluid communication between you and your students. Discuss techniques for increasing your visibility, connecting with students, and creating powerful learning environments.

 Armfield
Armfield

Learning Support Systems

Tue May 20, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

Educators have been encouraged to move beyond passive learning and develop pedagogies that encourage active learning for students brought up in a multitasking world. To accomplish this goal, educators must allocate their scarce resources toward pedagogic tools providing maximum affordance, and guidance in this endeavor is critical. Educating educators, however, is not necessarily easy. Mentor faculty teaming with instructional designers may provide ways to develop, test, and implement technologies and share best practices among faculty willing to learn. How this process works in a variety of learning contexts is explored.

Philip J Mizzi
Philip J Mizzi

Integrating Digital Media in Support of Learning: Pilot Studies at Northern Arizona University

Tue May 20, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

A panel discussion on the use of digital streaming video in Northern Arizona University courses in Anthropology, Education, and Health and Human Services. These studies were conducted through the NAU Cline Library during the Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 semesters to learn more about digital media technologies and how they might be used by faculty and students in support of learning. The discussion will address a description of course learning objectives and the criteria for selecting digital media, an identification of intellectual property issues, a summary of technological considerations, an analysis of faculty and students' perceptions of the approaches, an examination of what was learned, and future expectations.

Marjorie Reveal
Marjorie Reveal
Bruce Palmer
Bruce Palmer
Reed Riner
Reed Riner
Kathee Rose
Kathee Rose

Teaching Online: Risks vs. RewardsPE

With distance education via the World Wide Web on the rise, so too is the demand for university faculty members who will teach those courses. While traditional academic and professional expectations remain unchanged, the new medium presents a new context in which these faculty members live, work, and balance personal and professional decisions. This study provides a multidimensional perspective of one college of education’s faculty and administrators as they seek to negotiate this emerging environment. Previous literature focused on the risks and rewards associated with teaching in the emerging field of online instruction in higher education. Building upon this foundation, the researcher used an interpretive case study approach to describe the intersection of traditional academic and professional expectations with the changing field of online education at a medium-sized university’s college of education in the southwestern United States. Results from the study aligned with previous literature on the topic. Official state and university documents confirmed that there is no policy that recognizes the different environment in which university faculty work. Interviews confirmed the presence of risk and rewards associated with teaching online. Risks to teaching, research, service, and the annual performance review are discussed.

 Hopewell
Hopewell

Leveraging Technology to Explore and Create Digitized Primary SourcesC

Wed May 21, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

As we look at ways to engage the digital natives who now populate our classrooms, we propose two areas for faculty consideration; both connect to the Teaching with Primary Sources project, funded through a grant from the Library of Congress. First, use the Internet to access digitized primary sources. The digitization of everything from newspapers to official documents, private letters, images, political cartoons, maps, and artifacts makes possible greater access to these amazing items previously bound by geography if not time. Not only does this digitization provide an opportunity to get "up close and personal" with original items, it can also promote opportunities for students to become investigators, reporters, or researchers making their own analyses, judgments, and inquiries. Second, students can think outside the university walls, forming community connections by using technology for communication and preservation. Local communities, including the university itself, are filled with stories waiting to be discovered, preserved, and shared. Once students begin to access and investigate digitized primary sources, such as those that are available from the Library of Congress, National Archives, and local historical societies and museums, they can be challenged to capture local stories, preserving them digitally, and sharing them through Web 2.0 technologies.

Anne Bell
Anne Bell

Faculty Ideas about Technology: Pedatechnical PilatesPE

Educators and IT professionals must evaluate the instructional potential of emerging technologies. Faculty Ideas about Technology (FIT) was established to encourage exploration of new learning technologies in the classroom. Purdue University developed an interactive initiative that focuses on pedagogic, technical, and practical concerns of new technologies. By engaging faculty and working toward collective knowledge, Teaching and Learning Technologies (TLT), has successfully integrated FIT into an assessment framework for emerging technologies. Join us for this virtual presentation and find out what FIT is all about.

Kimberly Arnold
Kimberly Arnold
David Eisert
David Eisert

Emerging Technologies

Want to captivate your colleagues with innovative technologies that launch student engagement beyond classroom walls? How do we capture the attention of learners who are accustomed to paying only partial attention to multiple, competing sources of information around them?  How do we transform passive learning into an active commitment to learning?  Proposals should discuss practical uses of an emerging technology and its relevance to student learning.

Using Virtual Machines

The combination of newer multicore processor machines with rapidly evolving virtual machine technologies is providing new opportunities for developing technology curriculum. Using virtual machines, students can have access to their own server environments, including full administrator access without security risk to the campus infrastructure. Virtual machines provide a low-cost solution for implementing this educational environment, without dedicating expensive desktop hardware. This presentation discusses the current state of virtual machine technologies, provides an overview of how these technologies can support the teaching of curriculum that previously required dedicated labs, and demonstrates virtual machines using both UNIX and Windows.

Richard Toeniskoetter
Richard Toeniskoetter

Creating Virtual Hands-on Labs

Mon May 19, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

Educating students and practitioners in technology specific to their profession means providing authentic learning environments that include hands-on practice using experimental and production-grade systems. However, creating a flexible lab environment for practical technology instruction presents challenges. Furthermore, providing instruction in an online or distance program is virtually impossible using traditional computer labs. In business and industry, virtualization is used for prototyping, testing, and experimenting with different applications and computing environments. In an educational environment, students can use virtualization software to learn how to install operating systems; configure networks; and install, administer, and troubleshoot industry-specific software applications on their own computers without the need for physical computer labs. Instructors can pre-configure a virtual machine with a particular operating system and vertical software applications for customized lab instruction or assessment.

The University of Arizona School of Information Resources and Library Science will share its experience and plans for using virtualization technologies to create hands-on lab experiences that serve traditional and distance students in the Digital Information Management (DigIn) graduate certificate program. Several techniques will be discussed or demonstrated.

Bruce Fulton
Bruce Fulton

Game Design Made Easy

Mon May 19, 2008 4:00pm - 5:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

Using an icon-based system, learn how to master game development with your students. During the presentation, we will quickly design our own game and sample a few created by students using Game Maker 7.  (Game Maker 7 lite is a free download.)

Tahnja Wilson
Tahnja Wilson

Podcasting and Coursecasting: How and WhyC

Tue May 20, 2008 9:00am - 10:00am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

Podcasting and coursecasting are becoming popular, especially since over 80% of students have iPods or other devices that allow playback of lectures. This session explains the technology, benefits, and best practices of capturing lectures and publishing them to course management systems, iTunes U, or web sites. Research about the effect on retention, academic improvement, and student and teacher satisfaction will be presented. Discussion topics inclued whether to automate the process or to use manual capture. Demonstrations include the Echo360System (formerly Anystream/Apreso) and podcasting, vodcasting, and coursecasting solutions. Arizona State University, a large deployer of this technology, will discuss the implications for AZUN (Arizona Universities Network).

Pat Brogan
Pat Brogan

Free Range Learning: Getting off the GridP

Tue May 20, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333

Instructors who face the challenges of using technology in a computer classroom know what Walt Mossberg, a Wall Street Journal columnist, meant when he called IT departments, including university support organizations, "the most regressive and poisonous force in technology today" (speaking at the Chronicle of Higher Education Presidents Forum, June 2007). In response to instructional need for creativity and control in the classroom, this presentation proposes the use of Web 2.0 tools as an "off-the-grid" alternative to traditional IT control in the computer classroom.

In a fast-paced demonstration and participant discussion format, presenters will provide a flurry of new, free social-learning technologies for the next generation of teachers and learners.   

Tools explored include Google Scholar, Docs, Earth, and Reader; furl, flickr, bubbl.us, Wikipedia, Many Eyes, SurveyMonkey and PollDaddy, YouTube and TeacherTube, iTunes, VoiceThread, wikis, blogs, and more!

Colleen Carmean
Colleen Carmean
Alice Christie
Alice Christie

Collaborative Web 2.0 Tools in Higher Education: Faculty Experience with Google Apps and WikisP

Tue May 20, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

How can collaborative Web 2.0 applications, such as Google Apps and wikis,  improve teaching and research in higher education? Our research examines how faculty at one large, multicampus university use Google Apps and wikis. A Spring 2007 institutional survey about technology use asked faculty how frequently, and for what purposes, they used Google Docs and wikis. Only 20% of faculty indicated they used Google Docs for instruction (N=374) and 19% for research (N=359). Even fewer indicated they used wikis for instruction (7%, N=135) and for research (9%, N=168). A sample of these faculty were contacted again and asked to provide examples of their instructional strategies or assignments. They were also asked to describe how they incorporated these tools into their research process. In addition, these faculty were asked about the role of personal/collective responsibility when using these applications. Finally, faculty described what they saw as the benefits and limitations of these collaborative writing tools for teaching and research. Analysis and findings are framed within larger questions posed in the current literature on collaborative Web 2.0 tools.  We anticipate a lively discussion of how collaborative Web 2.0 applications are changing research, teaching, and learning.

Chong Ho Yu
Chong Ho Yu
Angel Jannasch-Pennell
Angel Jannasch-Pennell
Sam DiGangi
Sam DiGangi
Laura Brewer
Laura Brewer
Zeynep Kilic
Zeynep Kilic

Capturing a Vision: Synchronous Communication in an Online Public Speaking Class

Tue May 20, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

Campus administration had the vision of creating a fully online Public Speaking course that would include the use of interactive web technology to allow live student presentations. This is part of a college-wide initiative to infuse technology instruction across the curriculum.

Judith McManus, an experienced instructor, was paired with Laurie-Ann Schultz, an instructional designer with a rich technology background. The two discussed the delicate task of balancing the need to achieve course objectives while selecting and integrating multiple technologies. They chose Adobe Connect to provide synchronous online presentations.

The instructor was trained and supported during the initial offering of the course, and the designer facilitated live support sessions to provide a safe place for students to practice prior to their live online presentations. Students were required to have access to a webcam and microphone and to download browser plug-ins for the live sessions. Students’ and instructor’s mid-semester technological concerns were resolved by the end of the semester with the result being extremely favorable evaluations and an opportunity to improve the course prior to its next offering.

P Michael Carter
P Michael Carter
Judith  McManus
Judith McManus
Laurie-Ann  Schultz
Laurie-Ann Schultz

Evaluating Affordances: Emerging Technologies for Teaching and LearningP

Wed May 21, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 344 LAB

As new technologies enter the educational landscape, stakeholders struggle with understanding effective use. Looking to the Horizon Report (New Media Consortium, 2007), this work summarizes emerging technologies that offer potential for teaching, learning, and community building. Using face-to-face and virtual settings, the presenter led a doctoral cohort seminar in exploring learning affordances of the technologies recommended in the NMC report. Learners were from backgrounds as diverse as K-12 classrooms, special education, music education, and teacher development, as well as university libraries and student affairs. Use cases, future-casting, and applying tools within professional environments allowed the group to examine emergent technologies in situ. Potential technologies included Second Life, blogs, wikis, metatagging and the value of folksonomies, podcasting, and Web portals for ePortfolio research presentations. The benefits of using avatars, voice, chat, and messaging were explored and debated regarding interaction and communication at a deeper level than traditional course management features. Findings will be demonstrated as tools to formulate, communicate, and disseminate knowledge in a new, digital, social and collaborative framework.

Colleen Carmean
Colleen Carmean

NetSupport School: Lab Management for Windows

Wed May 21, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

NetSupport School is class-leading training software, giving teachers the ability to instruct, monitor, and interact with their students individually, in groups, or as an entire class. This presentation is a hands-on demonstration of NetSupport School.

Mark Manone
Mark Manone

Special Topics

This track incorporates presentations that do not necessarily fit within a particular track.

Connecting Resources & Producing Synergy: A Campus-Wide Self-Study

Mon May 19, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333

This presentation provides valuable information for institutions seeking reaccreditation with the Higher Learning Commission, describing Northern Arizona University's process and use of technology during its 10-year comprehensive review. The session focuses on how NAU engaged internal and external constituents in outreach efforts and describes innovative techniques, such as a campus-wide online self-study course, an accreditation database, and NCA Fairs. The presentation includes discussion of how technology can facilitate 10-year comprehensive reviews.

 

Stephanie McCarthy
Stephanie McCarthy
Rebecca Butcher
Rebecca Butcher

The Blackboard Outcomes System: Building a Culture of Continuous Improvement

Mon May 19, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 437

Many institutions are faced with a host of assessment challenges, from making data-based decisions to managing strategic initiatives focused on continuous improvement practices. Often these challenges are driven by both internal and external forces as well as a broadening constituent base. To facilitate assessment practices that support positive strategic and change management processes, institutions can turn to Blackboard for a solution. This session demonstrates how the Blackboard Outcomes System & Assessment Services can help institutions address their assessment challenges and build a culture of continuous improvement.

Donna  Jones
Donna Jones

A Facilitated Conversation about Teaching Consultations and Online or F2F Feedback Systems

Mon May 19, 2008 4:00pm - 5:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 437

The Center for Teaching and Learning is the office faculty contact when seeking guidance in their instructional work. We believe faculty consultations are keys to meeting the broader campus goal of improving students’ learning.

The Center and IT staff collaborated to offer the campus an online Mid-Semester Feedback System, integrated with each semester’s schedule of courses, faculty assignment, and student enrollment systems. Since winter 2004, nearly 800 faculty have participated and responded to student sentiments while the semester is in progress. The Center consults with faculty to discuss the results.

Small group instructional feedback (SGIF) is another useful consultative tool that will be demonstrated during this session. Students in courses taught by teaching assistants and new faculty have been engaged in these face-to-face feedback sessions, combined with their online mid-semester feedback. A faculty and consultant exchange will be simulated to illustrate the beneficial outcomes when faculty respond to students’ suggestions.

Cheryl Bielema
Cheryl Bielema

Google Apps for Education

Tue May 20, 2008 9:00am - 10:00am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 437

 

Google Apps offer schools an integrated suite of tools, including mail, instant messaging, calendars, documents, portals, and shared web sites, making it easy for educators and students to communicate and collaborate.

 

Jaime Casap
Jaime Casap

Faculty Panel Discussion on Effective Use of ElluminatePE

The panel members will discuss examples of their varied uses of Elluminate, a web conferencing tool, in Education, Spanish, and Management courses. Panelists will describe success stories, lessons learned, and their vision of the future of synchronous interaction over the web.

Cynthia Conn
Cynthia Conn
Rajeev Arora
Rajeev Arora
Joseph Collentine
Joseph Collentine
David Parmenter
David Parmenter

Wimba Voice Tools in the Second-Language Classroom: The Case of Spanish

Tue May 20, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333

Wimba Voice Board and Wimba Voice Presentation are two of several tools used in the sequence of Spanish 101 to 202 courses to develop students’ listening and speaking abilities at Northern Arizona University. This session demonstrates examples of use of the tools in online Spanish classes and shows how to set up the tools within Blackboard Vista.

Cecilia Ojeda
Cecilia Ojeda
George O'Keefe
George O'Keefe
Audra Travelbee
Audra Travelbee
 Kleinman
Kleinman

Rich Media ROI for Higher EducationC

Tue May 20, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 334

The advent of automatic classroom-to-web recording technology has dramatically increased the ROI of multimedia classrooms across higher education today. Institutions are taking advantage of the cost savings, increased reach, and improved educational outcomes afforded by “anytime/anywhere” rich-media learning objects. And with new technologies, including Mediasite by Sonic Foundry, the creation of rich media has never been more economical. Sean Brown, Vice President of Education for Sonic Foundry, will explore case studies, best practices, and live examples of the best rich-media applications and their impact on higher education.

Sean Brown
Sean Brown

Overview of iTunes U at NAU

Wed May 21, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 345

During the summer of 2008, NAU's e-Learning Center is conducting a pilot project in the use of Apple's iTunes U with the intent of making the service available campus-wide in Fall 2008. This presentation describes the work completed to date, the potential uses of the public and private sections of iTunes U, and the business rules, training, and workflows under development.

Dan Stoffel
Dan Stoffel
Lorraine Elder
Lorraine Elder

Open Lab

The open lab is an opportunity for you to explore a designated topic in greater depth. You can also check your email.

Tech Playground

Experiment with different technology applications used at NAU.

Walter Nolan
Walter Nolan

Open Lab - Clickers

Tue May 20, 2008 2:30pm - 3:30pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333
Larry MacPhee
Larry MacPhee

Open Lab - PBwikis

Wed May 21, 2008 10:30am - 11:30am The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333
Sharon Gorman
Sharon Gorman

Open Lab - Blackboard Scholar

Wed May 21, 2008 1:00pm - 2:00pm The W. A. Franke College of Business, Room 333
Larry MacPhee
Larry MacPhee