English 105

 

Welcome to English 105

You have chosen and exciting course that introduces you to critical reading and writing in the academic environment. It also helps you to develop technological literacy skills to rhetorically analyze online resources based on the audience addressed, the purpose explored, and the language used.

This page provides you with general information about English 105, various resources for writers (such as the NAU Writing Center, general writing guidelines, and the NAU Cline library resources), and links to the Technological Literacy Modules

Purpose

English 105 is a 4-credit-hour survey course that introduces you to critical reading and writing in the academic community. You will practice critical reading skills through close attention to text and to the skills needed to interpret texts effectively; critical writing skills through attention to the writing process and through formal writing tasks; technological literacy skills through rhetorical analysis of online resources based on the audience addressed, the purpose explored, and the language used. The specific target skills for English 105 are narrative writing, synthesis, rhetorical analysis, and application through argument writing.

The Course

In English 105, we look at the effects discourse has on all environments: classroom, political, electronic, ideological, historical, economic, and natural. Learning is an interactive process dependent on students as much as it is on a teacher. English 105 can only be successful if students take responsibility for their own learning: read the assignments, participate in class activities and small group work, write informal and formal papers, and present their findings in traditional and technology-enhanced settings. Students are encouraged to read critically, analyze texts rhetorically, and write critical argumentation papers about issues that they are confronted with in their various environments. Students are introduced to technological literacy by providing them with structured modules on how to critically read and produce text in technologically enhanced environments. The production of writing is a process that should engage students and that should provide them with purposeful learning opportunities.